Polica Dubova

Slovensko / English

Sanja Mihajlovik-Kostadinovska: (Nes)končni modeli kratke zgodbe

Sanja Mihajlovik-Kostadinovska
(Nes)končni modeli kratke zgodbe
Translated by Namita Subiotto
Pages: 120
Format: 129x198 mm
Paperback 
Published by KUD Police Dubove 
Year of publication: 2021
Edition: Eho, 25
ISBN 978-961-7020-68-7
ISBN (epub) (to be published)
Retail price: 15,90 €
Discount price: 12,90 €
E-book price: 9,99 €

Buy the book

Buy e-book

Write a review on Goodreads

REVIEWS

This dense, picturesque prose, which at times shades over into aphorism, offers an exciting view of a different kind of narrative that will doubtlessly stimulate readers’ imaginations.

Skopje-based publisher Begemot, which published Sanja Mihajlovik-Kostadinovska’s prose collection (In)Finite Models of the Short Story, has done much to encourage the originality and creativity of the form in the Macedonian literary landscape. Since 2016, Begemot has run a short-fiction and microfiction open-call, Estrangements (Очудувања), as well as putting out an eponymous edited volume collecting the best contributions according to their originality of style, narrative structure, and thematic ingenuity. The title of course recalls Viktor Shklovsky’s term остранение, and as editor Andrej Jovančevski writes in the preface to the first (twin) edition of Estrangements, evokes the boundless nature of narrative structures that, with their fresh and unusual takes on the form, elicit wonder from the reader. The edition includes works by Sanja Mihajlovik-Kostadinovska and it is thus no wonder that her first short story collection was soon to follow. 

The very title of the collection, along with the titles of its sections (Deli Stories, Irritating Stories, Sad Stories…) and individual stories (Čevapčiči with Onion, An Eyelash in an Eye, Sagging Breasts…), often no longer than a single page, clearly expresses the author’s imaginative and playful writing style. The book contains fictionalised models of short stories as parodic instruction manuals, guidelines and recipes for the writing and reading of this literary genre, which resemble witty justifications for the similarity between a story and an unexpected, often banal object – as for example in the story Paperclip: “this is a type of short story you can use to hold your thoughts together, so they don’t go all over the place”. It is precisely the comprehensiveness of these comparisons that produces a humorous, at times even sarcastic effect, when they become reminiscent of extracts from literary criticism, as in Aquarium Fish: “they say you have begun to repeat yourself, that you are going in circles.”

This dense, picturesque prose, which at times shades over into aphorism, offers an exciting view of a different kind of narrative that will doubtlessly stimulate readers’ imaginations.

Namita Subiotto

Browse the book:

www.policadubova.org © 2011